Sidekicks Blog

Sidekicks Support

Sidekicks Support

Sidekicks provides support services to individuals who face social, developmental or intellectual challenges on a daily basis

Apr 02
Published in Sidekicks Blog

‘Music with a Mission’

By Jim Gaven

Music is amazing. It is both intangible and tangible. It makes you feel something. It succeeds when words fail. For me, it is the great communicator and connector...an experience to enjoy and use for good to inspire and motivate. There is something magical, dare I say, something divine, that happens when people connect on a higher level, and I believe a channel of that higher level is through music.

Whether it be a band playing in a garage, a string quartet playing in a theater, a bird chirping in a tree, or the sound of a car horn, music is all around us. The question we have to ask ourselves is: Do we stop to really listen to it or do we hear it more in the background like a distant soundtrack to our lives? I would encourage you to adopt the saying ‘wake up and smell the roses’ and apply it to a ‘wake up and hear the music’ mentality. Music has helped me in many ways, namely becoming a better version of myself through the creative expression of songwriting, live performance, and most importantly, service. The positive, hopeful emotion that shines through music, if you are open to it, is transformational. And, I have been transformed. Hopefully you have, too! If not, there is still hope.

To do anything great and meaningful in life, it must be done with good intention and purpose. It is with this intention that I have been compelled to make a difference in the lives of those with developmental disabilities in the state of NJ. The unconditional love, compassion, and present state awareness I’ve seen in my 7 years of providing group and individual music sessions has been nothing short of a miracle. In continuing this passion of making a difference and using music as the tool to do so, I am excited to share Key of Awesome Music’s mission, Improving the Quality of Life With Music. This is an all-encompassing music company who has the individual’s and group’s best interest at heart, working with and bringing the best out of everyone, one note at a time. From one-on-one lessons to group sessions to live performances to publishing to licensing to consulting, Key of Awesome Music, LLC is looking forward to helping as many people as we can with music.

Feel free to ‘be a part of the band’ by spreading the goodness to all your family and friends whom you feel might be interested or benefit from our services.

For more information on Key of Awesome Music, LLC (Improving the Quality of Life with Music) as a qualified provider in NJ, please Click Here: , or contact Jim at jim.gaven@gmail.com and/or 609-558-7837.

 

Quick Artist Bio:
“Armed with the goal of helping others, Jim Gaven's mission is to write songs that make you think of a good time in your life, make you feel good about yourself, and most of all, put a smile on your face. The upbeat singer/songwriter from Hamilton, NJ wants to make a positive difference in the world and truly believes that music has the ability to do that. Quoted as saying, 'I want to inspire you to do great things as I have been inspired. The fact that you can create something out of nothing and have it last forever is amazing to me.' This is a true testament to the everlasting impact we can all have on each other, and Jim hopes to bring that kind of attitude to the forefront through song.

Links: To hear Jim’s music as a singer/songwriter, feel free to check out: www.jimgaven.bandcamp.com, or search for him as well as Amazon, iTunes, CDBaby, and Spotify.

To Learn more about Jim as a music publisher and to hear the 10 artists he represents for publishing, licensing, and placement opportunities, click here: www.soundcloud.com/key-of-awesome-music

For more information on Jim as an author, visit these sites: www.lulu.com/spotlight/jimgaven or www.allaboutalliterations.wordpress.com.

Jan 31
Published in Sidekicks Blog

Promoting Student Independence and Successful Inclusion through Systematic Use and Fading of Supports

Guest Blogger - Amy Golden, MS., BCBA
Behavior Therapy Associates

Being able to be as independent as possible often substantially impacts future success in all aspects of life (Causton-Theoharis, 2009; Hume, Loftin, & Lantz, 2009). Therefore, as a student moves through adolescence, it is essential for the educational team and family to place increasing emphasis on promoting student independence. This should be carefully considered when developing the individualized educational plan (IEP) for the student.

IEPs often focus on short-term goals and objectives projected for the year ahead, with supports and services to help the student achieve those skills. However, it is suggested that the IEP should be developed as a plan emphasizing independence, with long-term goals always on the forefront of the discussion. With this framework in mind, the team should focus on supports the student needs now to ultimately require less intrusive supports in the future. Goals for independent functional skills should be included in addition to those that are academically oriented. A variety of accommodations and modifications should center on promoting both student progress and independence (Asher, Gordon, Selbst & Cooperberg, 2010; Twachtman-Cullen, 2000). Areas of independence may include behaviors such as initiating tasks, transitioning between activities or locations, organizing materials, caring for one’s own daily needs, and more.

Paraprofessionals are routinely assigned to support students with autism spectrum disorders in the school environment (Giangreco, Halvorsen, Doyle, & Broer, 2004).  There are many clear advantages and disadvantages to this approach.  Paraprofessionals often provide the assistance students require to access less restrictive settings.  Some of their responsibilities may include taking the lead for implementing behavior plans, gathering important information about the student’s skills and deficits, promoting social interactions with peers, and collecting data (Twachtman-Cullen, 2000).  

A key advantage of the use of paraprofessional supports includes the ability to promote generalization for the student across environments. Having detailed knowledge of the student’s abilities and challenges allows them to plan ahead as well as prepare to assist the student in new situations and settings. While these are all reasonable tasks and often necessary benefits, providing 1:1 adult assistance can also be considered most restrictive and significantly impact the student’s autonomy. Peers may be less likely to approach and interact with the student due to an adult’s presence (Giangreco, Edelman, Luiselli, & MacFarland, 1997). The student may engage in spontaneous conversation more readily with the adult, creating an unnatural division from the student’s classmates. The potential for prompt dependency is also heightened when an adult is always present (Causton-Theoharis, 2009). Best intentions to provide support for the individual may result in too much being done for the student or the use of intrusive prompts without a careful fading plan.

Therefore, prior to establishing the need for 1:1 staffing, a thorough assessment of the specific areas for support should be completed. Teams should convene to determine what they anticipate achieving by using 1:1 supports and review if these needs can be met more effectively in other ways to promote student independence (Causton-Theoharis, 2009). For example, students may benefit from using communication devices, technology, additional visual cues, peer modeling, and environmental adaptations. Additionally, providing teachers and paraprofessionals with more advanced training can encourage the use of alternative and creative ways to assist the student (Stockall, 2014; Giangreco, Edelman, Luiselli, & MacFarland, 1997). Instructing staff on the principles of applied behavior analysis, such as content included in the training for Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT), can improve upon educators’ utilization of effective prompting and fading strategies (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2013).

Once 1:1 support is in place for a student, collecting data on the paraprofessional’s role can provide great insight into the student’s ongoing needs.  While it is customary to collect data focusing on student behavior, it is suggested that staff also self-monitor their own involvement with the student throughout the day.  Sample content may include the types of prompts being used, the number of prompts required, and the proximity of the paraprofessional to the student.  This information can be used to describe how the services are being used to support the student and point to areas in which the student requires further assistance.  For example, if a student has consistent difficulty with unpacking and organizing his belongings each day, a visual list or schedule can be implemented to orient the student to the required tasks with the goal of gradually removing the adult from the prompt. The visual prompt can remain in place long-term and allow the student to work independent of adult assistance. Continuous documentation indicating the need for verbal prompting can signal a potential concern, thus leading to the development of new intervention strategies specific to promoting self-sufficiency for the student.

Ongoing assessment should also help to determine if the 1:1 support is needed throughout the entire day or just for specific subjects or activities.  By reviewing the student’s schedule and targeted needs across environments, the paraprofessional can be scheduled for support only when necessary.  Thus, student independence can be promoted by fading the adult support from specific activities or subjects.  Fading may be done gradually, with the paraprofessional taking increasingly greater steps away from supporting the individual in each setting.  For example, a student may be accustomed to being escorted to the bathroom, between classes, or to the bus at the end of the day.  A plan for promoting the student’s independence would consider whether the student could learn to navigate these transitions on their own or perhaps with a peer.  Rather than relying on the adult to prompt the student, alternate strategies should be investigated.

As educational teams plan how to support students, focusing on long-term goals for greater independence will serve a student well by preparing him/her for the future.  Collecting data throughout the fading process can help to pinpoint any new concerns, allowing the team to consider novel strategies for helping the student and maximizing opportunities for self-sufficiency.

References

Asher, M. J., Gordon, S. B., Selbst, M.C., Cooperberg, M. (2010). The Behavior Problems Resource Kit: Forms and Procedures for Identification, Measurement, and Intervention. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Behavior Analyst Certification Board (2013). Registered Behavior Technician Task List

Causton-Theoharis, J.N. (2009). The golden rule of providing support in inclusive classrooms: Support others as you would wish to be supported.  Teaching Exceptional Children, 42(2), 36-43.

Doyle, M. B. (2008). The paraprofessional’s guide to the inclusive classroom: Working as a team (3rd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes

Giangreco, M.F. & Broer, S.M. (2007). School-based screening to determine overreliance on paraprofessionals.  Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, 22(3).

Giangreco, M.F., Edelman, S., Luiselli, T.E., & MacFarland, S.Z. (1997). Helping or hovering? Effects of instructional assistant proximity on students with disabilities. Exceptional Children, 64, 7–18.

Giangreco, M.F., Halvorsen, A.T., Doyle, M.B. & Broer, S.M. (2004). Alternatives to overreliance on paraprofessionals in inclusive schools.  Journal of Special Education Leadership, 17(2), 82-90.

Hume, K., Loftin, R. & Lantz, J. (2009).  Increasing independence in autism spectrum disorders: A review of three focused interventions. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 39(9), 1329-1338.

Stockall, N. S. (2014). When an aide really becomes an aid: Providing professional development for special education paraprofessionals. Teaching exceptional children46(6), 197-205.

Twachtman-Cullen, D. (2000). How to be a para pro: A comprehensive training manual for paraprofessionals.Higganum, CT: Starfish Specialty.

About the Author

Amy Golden, M.S., BCBA is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She received her undergraduate degree in Psychology and Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduate degree in Applied Behavior Analysis at St. Cloud State University

 

Click here for original posting

https://behaviortherapyassociates.com/promoting-student-independence-successful-inclusion-systematic-use-fading-supports/

Dec 30
Published in Sidekicks Blog

A Quick Reminder on the Importance of Giving Back

By Yilda - Sidekick
There aren't enough words in the dictionary to describe the significance of giving back. Even the most simple acts of benevolence, the ones we think are “no big deal” or “simple acts of kindness”, are actually incredibly important. Giving back or volunteering in any form strengthens our community. And selfishly, we feel better about ourselves overall. Giving back truly makes you feel like you are doing something bigger than yourself.

Every year as November rolls in and the holidays come knocking on the door, we all get a sense of happiness and feelings of appreciation. The holidays are such a special time to spend with family and loved ones. It is a time to take a few moments and reflect on what we are all truly grateful for. It is always important to remember the small things we have.  

When I reflect back, I realize how much our Superheroes mean to me.  The experiences we share are priceless and I will cherish them forever.  I am grateful to be on a team that makes positive impacts in the lives of others.  Our team has a lot of passion and love for helping others, and that is something I can be proud to be a part of.  

It is important to help the community as much as possible. Acts of kindness do not go unnoticed or unappreciated.  By giving back you can; make a difference, cherish rewarding experiences and do something bigger for yourself.  May this new year bring happiness, peace, and prosperity!

Nov 30
Published in Sidekicks Blog

The Growing Presence of Technology in Special Education

By: Christina Q . – ABA Therapist at Sidekicks

Technology has been rapidly expanding in our society, more today than ever before. As technology becomes more accessible, it has assumed many different purposes. Through both my Sidekicks experience, and my experience as a speech-language pathologist graduate student, I’ve seen technology used as a means of communication, reinforcement, and entertainment. Due to its growing availability, technology has assumed a role in our education system. In 2011, a study by Rollin’s KB found that when observing 141 general education teachers, 44% utilized technology at some point during their class. Technology has not only grown in the general education realm, but it also is implemented in special education classes as well. One study found that 100% of the speech-language pathologists surveyed believed that technology is helpful for the development of speech and language skills of children with intellectual disabilities (Fatima, Fazil, Malik, Akhtar, Ashraf, and Sumaira, 2012). Whether its function is to treat through therapy, or used as a motivating tool, technology is being utilized for both typically developing children and children with special needs alike. From a speech-language perspective, I’ve found technology to be a great addition to therapy for certain children.

There are so many different apps today that address speech and language issues. I currently work as a speech-intern at a special education school, and for some of my students, the use of a tablet has been an overwhelmingly positive experience. The students enjoy playing the games and many of the apps have a wonderful set up for taking data. Because the students enjoy playing the games so much, it is easier for them to stay on task and it helps me target their goals. On the contrasting side, I’ve tried to implement technology into therapy where it has been a very negative experience. Some of the children become too distracted by the tablet itself and are not able to attend to tasks or use the apps for their intended purpose. Whether it’s a matter of overstimulation or difficulty completing the tasks, the students can become easily frustrated in which case the implementation of technology is not beneficial. I’ve seen this both working with children at home through Sidekicks and through working with children through speech-language therapy. It’s a delicate balance trying to figure out when technology is an appropriate intervention for students, one that I am still learning.

There are endless types of technology being introduced into the markets daily, and technology from even five years ago can be drastically different from the technology we use today. This is one of the reasons why I am so interested in this area and how it pertains to my field, technology is continuously growing. For example, virtual reality, a technology originally created for entertainment purposes, is starting to be studied as a means to teach individuals social skills. I am currently in a Thesis course where my class has decided to focus on emerging technology (virtual reality) and how it can benefit children with autism. To understand what technologies can be most effective for children with autism, I believe it is critical get the perspective of the individuals who will be implementing this technology, specifically the parents/guardians of children with autism. Myself and a few of my classmates have created a survey that explores the parents/guardians of children with autism perceptions of technology. This survey explores what technologies are being utilized at home, what they are used for, whether the parents/guardians find that technology beneficial, and how receptive they are to new developing technologies. This information is important because it can help us determine future technologies will be beneficial at both home, at school, and in therapy settings for children with autism.

If you are a parent/guardian of a child with autism, I would greatly appreciate if you took the time to fill out this survey. If you are interested in completing the survey, please e-mail us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. It will also be posted on Sidekicks Support Services Facebook page.

Oct 31
Published in Sidekicks Blog

Creating Independent Recreation and Leisure Skills

By: Roe Bonomo BCBA Sidekicks

At some point many of us fear that our children are becoming coach potatoes or they perhaps are not engaged in a meaningful way. Well, have no fear; there are strategies to help you assist your child. Just as your child thrives best in a structured program at school, our goal is to provide that same premise of scheduled activities at home or in a community setting.

To begin, make a list of the activities that your child most enjoys. Make a special note of those he or she can do with little guidance from you. Examples are puzzles, Lego sets with step by step instructions, sticker books, Klutz books, tangram puzzles, crossword books, word finds, and “I Spy” picture books. The list is endless, however, the key is to isolate those activities that your child enjoys and can complete with minimal assistance. After all the idea is for your child to engage in a fun, constructive way during his or her down time!

For an earlier learner, begin with very simple inset puzzles or design activities that can be placed in zip lock bags. For example, if your child enjoys matching shapes, letters, or numbers then look for free printable worksheets online. To use them multiple times, you can laminate them and use dry erase markers. With a little ingenuity, activities can be designed for all ages and disabilities.

Now that you have selected some fun, independent activities, the next step is to put them together in a book for your child to follow. This is called an activity schedule. Its purpose is to provide a visual means for teaching independence during your child’s down times. For steps in creating an activity schedule, check out the link: https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/?pageId=394 . The easiest way is to take pictures of the activities you have selected and place them in a photo album. It is best to begin with three to five activities.

After your photo album is made, next set up an area where your child can readily retrieve these activities, such as a bookshelf. Clear the area of clutter which has a tendency to take over! Bins are the perfect choice for staying organized. Each activity can be placed in a separate bin. For young learners or newcomers to the activity schedule band wagon, place a picture of the activity on the outside of the bin.

To begin the path to independence, show your child that each picture corresponds to a matching bin on the shelf. Next, as you point to the picture, have your child retrieve the activity, complete it, and return the bin back to the shelf. He or she would next turn to the next page on the album and repeat the same sequence. Once your child gets the hang of it, you can saunter over to a room nearby and enjoy your leisure time!

You will find that activity schedules are a wonderful thing! In addition to fun stuff, you can also embed homework and exercise tasks into your child’s activity schedule. For example, your child can begin with a puzzle, do a math worksheet, walk on the treadmill for ten minutes, and end with another enjoyable activity such as an “I Spy” book. Even chores can be slipped into an activity schedule. There are a multitude of possibilities! Enjoy your child’s new found independence!

Oct 31
Published in Sidekicks Blog

Creating Independent Recreation and Leisure Skills

By: Roe Bonomo BCBA Sidekicks

At some point many of us fear that our children are becoming coach potatoes or they perhaps are not engaged in a meaningful way. Well, have no fear; there are strategies to help you assist your child. Just as your child thrives best in a structured program at school, our goal is to provide that same premise of scheduled activities at home or in a community setting.

To begin, make a list of the activities that your child most enjoys. Make a special note of those he or she can do with little guidance from you. Examples are puzzles, Lego sets with step by step instructions, sticker books, Klutz books, tangram puzzles, crossword books, word finds, and “I Spy” picture books. The list is endless, however, the key is to isolate those activities that your child enjoys and can complete with minimal assistance. After all the idea is for your child to engage in a fun, constructive way during his or her down time!

For an earlier learner, begin with very simple inset puzzles or design activities that can be placed in zip lock bags. For example, if your child enjoys matching shapes, letters, or numbers then look for free printable worksheets online. To use them multiple times, you can laminate them and use dry erase markers. With a little ingenuity, activities can be designed for all ages and disabilities.

Now that you have selected some fun, independent activities, the next step is to put them together in a book for your child to follow. This is called an activity schedule. Its purpose is to provide a visual means for teaching independence during your child’s down times. For steps in creating an activity schedule, check out the link: https://www.iidc.indiana.edu/?pageId=394 . The easiest way is to take pictures of the activities you have selected and place them in a photo album. It is best to begin with three to five activities.

After your photo album is made, next set up an area where your child can readily retrieve these activities, such as a bookshelf. Clear the area of clutter which has a tendency to take over! Bins are the perfect choice for staying organized. Each activity can be placed in a separate bin. For young learners or newcomers to the activity schedule band wagon, place a picture of the activity on the outside of the bin.

To begin the path to independence, show your child that each picture corresponds to a matching bin on the shelf. Next, as you point to the picture, have your child retrieve the activity, complete it, and return the bin back to the shelf. He or she would next turn to the next page on the album and repeat the same sequence. Once your child gets the hang of it, you can saunter over to a room nearby and enjoy your leisure time!

You will find that activity schedules are a wonderful thing! In addition to fun stuff, you can also embed homework and exercise tasks into your child’s activity schedule. For example, your child can begin with a puzzle, do a math worksheet, walk on the treadmill for ten minutes, and end with another enjoyable activity such as an “I Spy” book. Even chores can be slipped into an activity schedule. There are a multitude of possibilities! Enjoy your child’s new found independence!

Sep 22
Published in Sidekicks Blog

The Calm Within the Chaos

By: Jane Kleinman

Your life as a special needs parent might never become "easy".

This is a reality many of us struggle with every day. On top of the IEP fights, dealing with PerformCare/DDD, the scheduling of therapists, the emotional ups and downs of successes and setbacks, the juggling of home, work, siblings, extended family, and regular daily life...

The relentless reality of this can sometimes hit us
like a ton of bricks.

It's enough to send us into the bathroom with a glass of wine just to get some peace, or to want to stay in bed all day.

I have been right where you are.

I felt like I was drowning in my responsibilities and that I would never again have any life of my own. I developed resentment toward my husband, who was struggling as the sole breadwinner so I could be home with my son to see him through his days of therapy, and then school. Occasionally, I got a night out, but I was so starving for fulfillment, that it never felt like enough, and then I felt guilty for feeling ungrateful. It seemed I could never get in front of somehow feeling BAD about whatever I was doing. No matter how overwhelmed I was with trying to help my son, manage the house, be a good spouse, and a good parent to my typically developing daughter, it never felt like enough, and no matter what I did, I always felt gulity! I was yelling at my kids, my husband….I was miserable.


I needed to learn a NEW way to interact with the chronic struggle of my own life, so I turned to a practice that had always helped me before I became a parent. Yoga had always taken me away from my stress, relaxed and soothed me, and helped me feel happier, but getting away from my life to practice yoga once I had my son seemed impossible. But I knew that I had to do something, so I made a commitment to start small. One yoga class whenever I could, just to get back into moving and breathing and feeling something other than despair. After a bit, I gave myself permission to be away from my responsibilities for 90 minutes a week, and you know what happened? Nothing. And EVERYTHING.

Nothing fell apart, and no disasters ensued. All my responsibilities were still there when I came back from class. But EVERYTHING about how I dealt with my life, how I handled the stress, how I felt about my challenging life DID change. I decided to pursue a long held goal to get my yoga teacher certification, and that’s when I really learned how to make my life my yoga practice, and nothing has ever been the same since. I still have challenging times, don’t get me wrong. My son is 16 (puberty stinks), and in many ways, this year has felt as bad as any of those earlier years, but NOW I have the tools I need, and the connection to a profoundly deep inner knowing that I am one breath away from less stress, one movement away from less fatigue, one meditation away from deep peace.

Until I learned how to bring the practices that I learned "on the mat" INTO my daily life, I knew that I'd continue to be impatient with my family, struggle to feel fulfilled, feel constantly overwhelmed by the enormity of my task, and forever feel inadequate to deal with it. 

So, I learned how to breathe in the middle of a stressful situation and what kind of breathing would help. I learned to use the physical body that I have (with all it's perceived "imperfections") to bring me back down to earth when things felt like they were spinning out of control.

And most importantly, I learned to recognize, appreciate and CELEBRATE the monumental job I do every single day, and to be ok with myself even when I felt like I came up short one day.

THIS is how you handle it. THIS is how you go on when it feels like it's too much.

THIS is why I created

The Calm Within The Chaos,

A Yoga Circle for Parents of Kids with Disabilities

And I can help you to learn how as well.

Together…

  • We will learn to breathe to help ease stress and anxiety.
  • We will learn to move our bodies in ways that feel safe, soothing and keep us grounded when

we feel out of control.

  • We will see our own greatness reflected back to us as we share our struggles and triumphs as only another parent raising a child with special needs can understand.


This step-by-step guidance and loving support will help you to feel more relaxed, more able to cope with the challenges you face each day, and more like the person you may remember you once were, but have long ago put to the side because you think you must put all of yourself into your child.

  • Don't spend another day beating yourself up for what you did "wrong" or how you weren't "enough".
  • Don't go to another stressful IEP meeting without knowing a breathing technique that can help you feel your inner strength and power.
  • Don't spend another five minutes in the bathroom just to get a break. (Ok, the bathroom is always a good place to go, but learn to use your time in there to recharge!)

For more information visit my Facebook at

https://www.facebook.com/SacredSpaceYogaandMassageTherapy/

Aug 30
Published in Sidekicks Blog

Back to School – 5 tips for Parents

By: Yasmine Burd Sidekick/Supervisor

With the start of school fast approaching, it can seem like a daunting task to get a child back in a school mentality. Below are 5 tips to help ease the transition from summertime to a school routine:

1. Go into the school prior to the first day. This is the time for the parent and child to find the child's new classroom and to become familiar with the route of arriving/leaving from the drop off location.

2. Prepare your child. Have a small conversation with your child the days leading up to school about school starting up. Change is difficult for many children and preparing your child early in knowing a big change in their schedule is going to happen will help with reducing a potential melt down and frustration. Have your child assist in the shopping for school materials. This will help to ensure that your child gets the right brand, color, or texture of the required materials, if your child is particular about their items.

3. Consistency is key. Establish a morning and after school routine and stick to it. The more consistent the parent and child are to following the routine, the more your child will start to develop independent skills. Practice the routines with your child prior to the start of school. Go over where their backpack will be, appropriate places to complete homework, etc. Also keep consistency with color coding and labeling school supplies. If one folder has the child's name, home room teacher and room number, then all folders need to have the same information. Furthermore, if a blue folder is labeled "Math," then the blue notebook needs to also be "Math.”

4. Be open and honest with your child's teacher. It can be overwhelming with receiving welcome letters and parent surveys to fill out, but this is the time to be detailed in your responses. Teachers want as much information about your child as possible in the first few days of forming a connection. You know your child the best and teachers are looking for any type of guidance to best support your child's learning. So let the teacher know what strategies at home work well with your child when he/she are frustrated or send in items that help soothe your child if it is a fidget item or chew toy to help with attention.

5. Continue the conversation at home. Talk to your child about their day and see if connections can be made with the learning that is occurring in the classroom to their own experiences. Having a brief conversation about their learning will help your child to process, understand, and generalize their new knowledge.

 

Jul 30
Published in Sidekicks Blog

6 P’s for an Effective Outing

By: Jane Lynn – Owner Navigate Autism

About the Author:
Jane Lynn Britton, was a professional HR leadership trainer and coach for 20 years. She quit her career to homeschool her son, William, with autism. That was 8 years ago. Today, both Jane Lynn and William are stronger, more confident, relaxed and happy. William is back in school, and Jane Lynn partners with parents who want to create a more relaxed and harmonious life for themselves and to help their children thrive. She does this through her business venture, "Navigate Autism with Jane Lynn". Oh, and by the way, William is one of our Superheroes!

Avoid the stress of summer outings by using The 6 P’s for an Effective Outing

“We get to go to the store! Show me where you want to go!” When I say these magic words to my son, William, he gets so excited that he immediately gets ready and goes to the car with a wide smile and sparkling eyes. My heart is so full of love for him as well as enthusiasm for our outing, that I can’t even remember the day when I used to dread taking him out of the house. Yet, there was a time that my fear of his unexpected behavior and of everyone’s judgment kept me home. Not so long ago when we needed to go out, I was apprehensive and stressed. However, this changed once I decided to let go of the judgments from myself and others, and learned how to create effective and fun outings.

There are 6 key steps, which are very simple, and if you follow them one-by-one, you will see how easy it is to go on outings that leave both you and your child wanting more! Even in the summer time, when stores are crowded and people are more animated and loud.

Step 1: Plan

Don’t just show up. Plan before you go. If you can, check out the location before you go with your child. If it’s a small store or you are going to visit a friend or family member’s house, talk to them and explain what kind of outing you are doing and what you hope to accomplish, as well as what they might expect when you come. You can also ask for their help in some way in order to ensure a smooth outing, and to prepare them for your visit. Also, answer these questions for yourself:

  1. What do I want to do?
  2. Where do I want to go?
  3. Who is going?
  4. What time of day is calm at this place?
  5. How long will it take to get there?
  6. How do I get there?
  7. Where is the best place to park near my destination?
  8. Where is the bathroom?
  9. What do I need to take? (e.g. extra clothes, snack, etc.)
  10. What are the obstacles, if any about this outing?

Step 2: Prepare

This step is to think of all the things that you are going to need to take with you and to then pack them all before you leave. Some of these items may include:

  1. Extra clothes
  2. Bags
  3.  Hand wipes
  4. Snacks
  5. Chew toy
  6. Hand/fidget toy
  7. Child’s wallet (if going to store)
  8. Communication device (if use one)
  9. Your wallet
  10. Your phone
  11. Your glasses

One thing I would suggest is to put everything in a backpack that you will wear during the outing. This will keep your hands free to open doors, guide your child, help pick out items, help pay, etc. Also, wear pockets to put your keys into and small things that you may need in an instant.

When you arrive at the destination, ask your child to get the backpack out of the car. This will slow him down and keep him from hopping out of the car and running across the parking lot. It also gives him something weighted to carry, which helps to ground his body and focus his attention.

Once your child is focused and next to you, you can take the backpack and put it on your back. Now, after following these steps, you are ready to go….and your hands are FREE and ready to help your child in any way.

Step 3: Patient

Patience is key! The one thing we can count on is that there will be surprises. And since our children are so connected with us, as well as sensitive, they respond to our emotions. Therefore, it is not surprising that when we stay relaxed and patient, our children are more relaxed. And when this happens, they stay connected with us and listen better. They also don’t want or need to run or get away, which interestingly, helps us to be even calmer and it gives us more control of the situation. 

Sometimes being patient is saying that it’s OK to leave the store or outing earlier than expected, even right after it starts. If your goal is to have a successful outing, but your child is not able to do that today for some reason, it’s OK. With patience, you help your child take care of himself/herself. This also builds trust, and the next time you suggest an outing, your child will most likely want to go, because s/he knows you will be flexible and respond to his/her needs with love and support. And, then with persistence, you can start to have longer, more enjoyable outings.

Step 4: Praise

Who doesn’t like to be praised or celebrated for what they have done? We want to motivate our children to continue to be calm, focused and to listen during the outing, and praise will help us achieve this. We can say things such as: "Thank you for helping me with that backpack." Or, "Nice job walking calmly with me into the mall." Every little thing that your child is doing is praise-worthy.

It’s easy to praise when they do something well. But, what is really POWERFUL and creates the most successful outing is when we praise our children even when they do something we don’t want. Because of this, they will calm down, trust us, and listen better. For instance, if your child takes the cart and runs through the store screaming, praise him/her for showing you that s/he wanted to go to a different part of the store...or that something was bothering him/her and s/he needed to go to a more comfortable place. Then lovingly tell him/her that a better way to do it is to walk calmly so s/he doesn’t run into or scare anyone. This will surprise your child, who is waiting to be reprimanded, because your child is smart and knows the behaviors that you like or call “good behavior”. And when s/he is feeling supported and loved, s/he will listen better and become calmer in the store.

Step 5: Put it to use

Giving your outings relevance and purpose not only teaches your children more about life, but also motivates them to want to go out more. If you're out shopping and you buy something, use it right when you get home. If you went to an event and you took pictures, print out the pictures, and show it to your child as soon as you can. All of this brings relevance and purpose to what you've done, and it inspires him/her to want to go on more outings.

Step 6: Practice

The final step is Practice! Continue to go on outings, because the more you practice, the more routine, comfort and joy you will build. I've had times where it's been stressful when we went out in the community, and as a result I didn't want to go again. But, I didn’t give in. I continued to practice and use these six P’s, and it eventually became easier. And today, my son and I both look for as many opportunities as we can to go out together. 

Jun 30
Published in Sidekicks Blog

The Upshot of Supported Downtime

By: Judy Saunders (Intake Coordinator/Supervisor)

For many of our Superheroes, the handling of “downtime” or unstructured time can be one of the most challenging times of the day. School or perhaps a day program has provided routine and structure in a supportive environment. In some cases, individuals may participate in competitive employment or volunteer opportunities within the community where expectations are clear, tasks are clearly defined; days and hours are scheduled. In addition, social opportunities and peer groups are an integral part of their day.

When they return home, the lack of structure can be overwhelming often leading to isolation, anxiety and regressive behaviors. Very often, parents at the end of their day begin the task of trying to identify and implement routines.

Sidekicks provide that valuable opportunity to add structure and routine to aspects of a Superhero’s day. Weekly schedules that include community integration and daily living skills lend goal oriented experiences culminating in productive and positive outcomes. There is so much potential for learning, growth and relationship building during supported “downtime.”

Being out in the community also helps reinforce and transfer skills such as money handling, social skills and maintaining appropriate hygiene. In addition, developing greater tolerance to those sensory and environmental stimuli that can often cause maladaptive behaviors can lead to increased self-esteem and greater self-awareness.

Just as important, the ability to make choices and invest in decision making and planning gives control and autonomy in the process. This gives way to self-satisfaction and enjoyment.

Learning how to manage “downtime” is hard. It requires time management, judgement, executive functioning and social skills to name few.

When families work together with their Sidekicks many of these skills will be addressed and Superheroes can rise to the highest level of expectation. That’s the upshot of supported downtime!

 

Page 1 of 3
BIGtheme.net Joomla 3.3 Templates